Faculty of Applied Science

 

Welcome to the Faculty of Applied Science at the University of British Columbia, a place where architects and landscape architects, community and regional planners, nurses and engineers contribute to a better world.

Comprising the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, the School of Community and Regional Planning, the School of Nursing, and all Engineering departments, programs and research centres at both UBC’s Vancouver and Okanagan campuses, Applied Science represents a sampling of the professions that support a civil and sustainable society. Since 1915, UBC Applied Science has a long history of educating leaders and making significant research contributions. We invite you to be part of the future with us.

Engineering Course Packages

June 5 - July 5, 2017

Civil Engineering
Structural Materials
The structure and properties of common Materials used in civil engineering structures such as Portland cement Concrete, asphalt concrete, timber and steel will be studied. The emphasis is on the relationship between the production and structure of these materials and their mechanical properties and durability when used in structures. The course will include field visits to construction sites and presentations from industry personnel.
Laboratory Testing of Structural Materials
The course will focus on testing structural materials used in civil engineering structures such as Portland cement Concrete, asphalt concrete, timber and steel in the laboratory. Some topical problems will be identified in the performance of these structural materials and students in groups will carry out laboratory experiments to study the materials involved. This is a laboratory based course where site-visits and external consultations are an integral requirement.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems
Do you want to save the planet with green power? This course covers the fundamentals of renewable energy systems and includes topics on energy storage, power generation, distribution, transportation, and consumption. We will start with an introduction to carbon emissions, climate change, and environmental pollution to emphasize the importance of sustainability. Students will learn about solar, wind and ocean power generation. Grid connection and microgrids will be explained, as well as battery storage and fuel cell systems. Modern loads such as LED lights and electric vehicles will be discussed around the concept of demand side management. Students will gain skills on these emerging and keys areas of green power and will have the opportunity to consider several case studies/examples. The course includes some tutorials and demonstrations using simulation software and physical equipment. What could be more important? The global energy markets will be dominated by renewables in the future - the planet will depend on engineers with a strong background in green power.
Electricity and Conversion for Renewable Power
How do we make renewable power generation happen? Renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and ocean are intermittent and fluctuating. Changes in sun irradiance during the day, in wind speed variation, and changing ocean tidal velocity produce fluctuations in power generation. This course covers the fundamental of electricity and power conversion to transform variable/fluctuating energy into high quality power required to supply loads. The principles of power conversion for AC and DC system will be covered. Application examples will include topics such as power converters for battery chargers, solar inverters, wind/ocean power conversion, and traction for electric vehicles. The course will provide a strong theoretical background and enable students to understand renewable power conversion at the system level. A practical/applied component will be included, providing the student with real-world problem solving scenarios, laboratory experiences and visits to UBC state of the art power facilities.

July 15 - August 15, 2017

Chemical Engineering
Harnessing Physics: an Introduction to Matter, Energy, and Chemical Engineering
Matter and energy are the building blocks of our universe. Using their understanding of these concepts, chemical engineers re-organize¬ and transform matter and energy to produce new substances and materials. From the pharmaceuticals we take when we are sick, to the fuel we put in our cars, to the plastics, alloys and polymers that we find in our homes, in our phones and virtually everywhere around us, chemical engineers are involved, always keeping economic and environmental sustainability in mind. This course provides an introduction to the chemical engineering discipline, first by providing an overview of the physical processes and laws involved in the conversion of raw materials into refined products, and secondly by applying these concepts into more practical applications and designs. Students will have the opportunity to perform laboratory experiments illustrating some key concepts, as well as cap off the course and establish connections with newly acquired theory by visiting an operating industrial facility. No prior knowledge of chemical engineering is required to take this course.
Harnessing Nature: an Introduction to Biological Engineering
Science has advanced to a point at which humankind now asserts its dominion over the very building blocks of life, and engineers are at the forefront of the efforts to harness the power of biological systems and develop new technologies, materials, medical tools and treatments, foods, industrial products and environmental processes to improve the world around us. This course provides an introduction to biological engineering, covering subjects that include introductions to microbiology, cell biology, and genetic engineering, bioprocessing for the production of biofuels, foods and pharmaceuticals, biomaterials, and recent advances in tissue engineering. Parallels are also drawn between biological systems and the chemical systems discussed in Course I. The ethics and social aspects of bioengineering are also discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to apply theory into practice through lab experiments, and to witness bioprocessing and sustainable design in action with a visit through a tour to a local biological waste treatment plant. No prior knowledge of biochemistry or biological engineering is required to take this course.
Civil Engineering
Structural Materials
The structure and properties of common Materials used in civil engineering structures such as Portland cement Concrete, asphalt concrete, timber and steel will be studied. The emphasis is on the relationship between the production and structure of these materials and their mechanical properties and durability when used in structures. The course will include field visits to construction sites and presentations from industry personnel.
Laboratory Testing of Structural Materials
The course will focus on testing structural materials used in civil engineering structures such as Portland cement Concrete, asphalt concrete, timber and steel in the laboratory. Some topical problems will be identified in the performance of these structural materials and students in groups will carry out laboratory experiments to study the materials involved. This is a laboratory based course where site-visits and external consultations are an integral requirement.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Communication Systems: Technology Embedded in Daily Life

Do you want to save the planet with green power? This course covers the fundamentals of renewable energy systems and includes topics on energy storage, power generation, distribution, transportation, and consumption. We will start with an introduction to carbon emissions, climate change, and environmental pollution to emphasize the importance of sustainability. Students will learn about solar, wind and ocean power generation. Grid connection and microgrids will be explained, as well as battery storage and fuel cell systems. Modern loads such as LED lights and electric vehicles will be discussed around the concept of demand side management. Students will gain skills on these emerging and keys areas of green power and will have the opportunity to consider several case studies/examples. The course includes some tutorials and demonstrations using simulation software and physical equipment. What could be more important? The global energy markets will be dominated by renewables in the future - the planet will depend on engineers with a strong background in green power.

Electricity and Conversion for Renewable Power
How do we make renewable power generation happen? Renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and ocean are intermittent and fluctuating. Changes in sun irradiance during the day, in wind speed variation, and changing ocean tidal velocity produce fluctuations in power generation. This course covers the fundamental of electricity and power conversion to transform variable/fluctuating energy into high quality power required to supply loads. The principles of power conversion for AC and DC system will be covered. Application examples will include topics such as power converters for battery chargers, solar inverters, wind/ocean power conversion, and traction for electric vehicles. The course will provide a strong theoretical background and enable students to understand renewable power conversion at the system level. A practical/applied component will be included, providing the student with real-world problem solving scenarios, laboratory experiences and visits to UBC state of the art power facilities.
Communication Systems: Technology Embedded in Daily Life
Tweets, blogs, emails, videos, texts … we rely on a myriad of communication systems but how do these systems really work? This course will start off by exploring the key historic technology breakthroughs that have led to modern communication systems. This will be followed by an introduction to how information is represented and why the digital revolution is the underpinning of modern communication. The remainder of the course will analyze current communication systems, technologies and standards selected to give the students a comprehensive overview of what is on the market. Examples include the LTE wireless standard which is common in most cell phone networks, Wi-Fi for local wireless communication, and modem technology which enables information to be transmitted and received over fiber optic cables, wires or air. Students will build their knowledge through case studies of current communication technologies and systems with an emphasis on understanding and relating performance specifications to the user experience.
Introduction to Digital Systems Design with FPGAs

Digital systems lie at the heart of almost any electronic system including wearable devices, cell-phones, signal processing systems, computers, biomedical devices, etc. In all of these systems, the "intelligence" of the system is implemented in digital logic. This course introduces digital systems, and how to design them. More specifically, you will learn about combinational and sequential logic, synchronous and asynchronous circuits, embedded processors, and other related topics. The course will have a significant laboratory component, where a digital hardware design language (VHDL) will be introduced and employed to bring to life your digital designs on an FPGA (field programmable gate-array) board.

The focus of the two courses will be on principles for modern Internet technologies. Prior programming experience (for example, with C/C++, Java, Python) and an ability to learn new languages will be assumed. In particular, students will be expected to complete a mini-project using JavaScript and related technologies that emulates a real-world application.
Algorithms and the World Wide Web
The Internet and the World Wide Web have enabled new methods for communicating and working with data. What is the underlying infrastructure for the Internet? What are the algorithms used to move bits of data around? How is your credit card number kept secure when you buy a book from Amazon or Baidu? How is your location determined using GPS when you play Pokémon Go? How do some dating web sites match people? We will discuss some of the system building and algorithmics that power the World Wide Web.
Building Modern Web Applications

Do you want to develop your own web-based application? Have you dreamed of making quick and slick looking web applications that are also robust? We will discuss the central abstractions and principles that enable the development of robust web applications. These principles can be applied when building applications using technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

Music: An introduction to Electrical & Computer Engineering

Music has become an integral part of our daily life, but so few understand the engineering behind it. This course will give you an overview of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), revolving around music. Several aspects of ECE will be covered, including the basics of acoustics and waves, the technology behind microphones, the electronic circuits behind amplifiers, analog to digital converters (ADCs) and digital to analog converters (DACs), sampling theory, signal processing using analog and digital filters, operation of speakers, encoding and compression techniques used in mp3, etc.

Music Laboratory: Hands on Learning

Have you ever wondered how a DJ machine works? What are all those knobs used on a mixer? How does a noise cancellation headphone work? In this hands-on course, students will learn about the technical details of different equipment used by recording artists and DJs, such as mixers, distortion units, bass pedals, synthesizers, and MIDI. Students will design and test a guitar amplifier as a class project.