School of Community and Regional Planning

 

The School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) at UBC was one of the first dedicated planning schools in Canada. Founded in 1951, we have over six decades of experience in graduate planning education and research. 

SCARP's mission is to advance the transition to sustainability through excellence in integrated policy and planning research, professional education, and community service.

We work, live and play in one of the most scenic urban settings in the world. Vancouver is home to a culture of environmentalism and pluralism with a long history of activism and action. It is also home to formidable socio-economic problems in the Downtown Eastside and elsewhere. Our work is endlessly challenging and there is no shortage of both issues to tackle, and inspiration to draw from, in our lively and dynamic city.

Visit the School of Community and Regional Planning website

June 8 - July 8, 2019 Course Packages

Urban Big Data Analysis
With the advent of open data movement, knowledge and skills for collecting and analyzing big data become increasingly important for urban planners. This course will teach you how to harness the power of big data by mastering the way they are collected, organized, and analyzed to support better decision making in urban planning context. You will learn the basic tools needed to manipulate large datasets derived from various open-data platforms, from data collection to storage and approaches to analysis. You will capture and build data structures, perform SQL and basic queries in order to extract key metrics and insights. In addition, you will learn how to use open-source programming tools, such as R and Python, to analyze and visualize the data. These statistical tools and methods will be complemented by machine learning and pattern detection techniques, in addition to new technologies for big data.
Spatial Analysis Using Geographic Information Systems
GIS technology sits at the intersection of the world around us and our incredible computing capabilities that allows us to investigate and visualize that world in new and exciting ways. This course will introduce you to key concepts, methods, and tools used to collect, analyze, map, and visualize geospatial data. You will explore what makes spatial data special, some of the ways it is collected, and how it can be used to answer questions about the world around us. You will use geospatial data to help with decision making and to inform policy-making. You will use computer-based geographical methods of data input and analysis to model the world around them, to explore real-world scenarios, and present their findings to others. Practical applications will be investigated in both the natural and human realms through lectures, discussions, group exercises, and a hands-on computer lab component.

July 13 - August 13, 2019 Course Packages

Urban Big Data Analysis

With the advent of open data movement, knowledge and skills for collecting and analyzing big data become increasingly important for urban planners. This course will teach you how to harness the power of big data by mastering the way they are collected, organized, and analyzed to support better decision making in urban planning context. You will learn the basic tools needed to manipulate large datasets derived from various open-data platforms, from data collection to storage and approaches to analysis. You will capture and build data structures, perform SQL and basic queries in order to extract key metrics and insights. In addition, you will learn how to use open-source programming tools, such as R and Python, to analyze and visualize the data. These statistical tools and methods will be complemented by machine learning and pattern detection techniques, in addition to new technologies for big data.

Spatial Analysis Using Geographic Information Systems

GIS technology sits at the intersection of the world around us and our incredible computing capabilities that allows us to investigate and visualize that world in new and exciting ways. This course will introduce you to key concepts, methods, and tools used to collect, analyze, map, and visualize geospatial data. You will explore what makes spatial data special, some of the ways it is collected, and how it can be used to answer questions about the world around us. You will use geospatial data to help with decision making and to inform policy-making. You will use computer-based geographical methods of data input and analysis to model the world around them, to explore real-world scenarios, and present their findings to others. Practical applications will be investigated in both the natural and human realms through lectures, discussions, group exercises, and a hands-on computer lab component.

City-X: Urban Transformation in a Globalized World

The rapid rise of cities – from Bogota to Bangkok, Shanghai to Sydney, Vienna to Vancouver, and all urban nodes in-between – imposes global challenges and opportunities for the 21st century and beyond. Today, the modern metropolis functions not only as a financial command-and-control centre in an internationalized economy but also as a testbed for technological innovation and a creative hub that attracts people from near and far. How are these world trends shaping the spatial conditions of cities? In turn, what are the implications of these spatial conditions on urban life? Through a combination of field trips, hands-on workshops, and interactive lectures, this introductory course will provide a novel learning platform to examine current and future scenarios of urban transformation in a globalized world.

Past, Present, and Future: Building from Vancouver’s Multicultural Planning History

Vancouver’s residents are comprised of different communities made up of different religions, ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. More than 40% of Vancouver residents were born in another country. These communities have shaped and transformed Vancouver’s social fabric, the local economy, and the built form of the city. In this course, students will connect issues such as urban development, gentrification, re-zoning, community-action projects, global immigration, and sustainability agendas with the ongoing evolution of intercultural understanding and multicultural cosmopolitanism in Vancouver. Through site visits to key locations throughout the city such as Chinatown, Stanley Park, Olympic Village and the False Creek Flats, students will unpack the diverse and complex history of the communities who contribute to city building processes in Vancouver. This course will include both classroom theory and lectures, as well as site visits with student reflection and discussion in the field.

Family Recipes and their Business Potential: Designing A Tourism Guide to Family Food Businesses in Vancouver

This course is aimed at stimulating student interest in a range of careers: business/marketing, economic development, community planning, hospitality, photography and media studies, anthropology, history and heritage conservation, computer programming, and social advocacy. By going ‘behind the scenes’ at restaurants and family food businesses in Vancouver, students will discover how family recipes get handed down over the generations and become a selling point for the city’s bespoke food industry. Students will research the city’s multicultural history of foods as social enterprise, family histories, photographically document food culture, and identify creative, successful, business practices. The instructor has several years’ experience with teaching material cultural analysis to MBA students in business school. Students will collaboratively design the template for a free, web-based HTML guide to Vancouver’s family food businesses, in consultation with Tourism Vancouver.

Past, Present, and Future: Building from Vancouver’s Multicultural Planning History

Vancouver’s residents are comprised of different communities made up of different religions, ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. More than 40% of Vancouver residents were born in another country. These communities have shaped and transformed Vancouver’s social fabric, the local economy, and the built form of the city. In this course, students will connect issues such as urban development, gentrification, re-zoning, community-action projects, global immigration, and sustainability agendas with the ongoing evolution of intercultural understanding and multicultural cosmopolitanism in Vancouver. Through site visits to key locations throughout the city such as Chinatown, Stanley Park, Olympic Village and the False Creek Flats, students will unpack the diverse and complex history of the communities who contribute to city building processes in Vancouver. This course will include both classroom theory and lectures, as well as site visits with student reflection and discussion in the field.